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Tipitaka Sutta Pitaka Samyutta Nikaya Context of this sutta

Samyutta Nikaya XXXVI.1
Samadhi Sutta
Concentration
Translated from the Pali by Nyanaponika Thera
For free distribution only,
by arrangement with the Buddhist Publication Society
From Contemplation of Feeling: The Discourse-grouping on the Feelings (WH 303), translated from the Pali by Nyanaponika Thera (Kandy: Buddhist Publication Society, 1983).

"There are, O monks, these three feelings: pleasant feelings, painful feelings, and neither-painful-nor-pleasant feelings."

A disciple of the Buddha, mindful,
clearly comprehending, with his mind collected,
he knows the feelings[1] and their origin,[2]
knows whereby they cease[3] and knows the path
that to the ending of feelings lead.[4]
And when the end of feelings he has reached,
such a monk, his thirsting quenched, attains Nibbana."[5]


Notes

1. Comy.: He knows the feelings by way of the Truth of Suffering. [Go back]

2. Comy.: He knows them by way of the Truth of the Origin of Suffering. [Go back]

3. Comy.: He knows, by way of the Truth of Cessation, that feelings cease in Nibbana. [Go back]

4. Comy.: He knows the feelings by way of the Truth of the Path leading to the Cessation of Suffering. [Go back]

5. Parinibbuto, "fully extinguished"; Comy.: through the full extinction of the defilements (kilesa-parinibbanaya). [Go back]


 


Updated: 1-7-2000

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