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Tipitaka Sutta Pitaka Khuddaka Nikaya Udana Context of this sutta

Udana II.2
Raja Sutta
Kings
For free distribution only, as a gift of Dhamma

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Now at that time a large number of monks, after the meal, on returning from their alms round, had gathered at the meeting hall when this discussion arose: "Friends, which of these two kings has greater wealth, greater possessions, the greater treasury, the greater stock of riding animals, the greater army, greater power, greater might: King Seniya Bimbisara of Magadha or King Pasenadi of Kosala?" And this discussion came to no conclusion.

Then the Blessed One, emerging from his seclusion in the late afternoon, went to the meeting hall and, on arrival, sat down on a seat made ready. As he sat down there, he addressed the monks: "For what topic are you gathered together here? And what was the discussion that came to no conclusion?"

"Just now, lord, after the meal, on returning from our alms round, we gathered at the meeting hall when this discussion arose: 'Friends, which of these two kings has greater wealth, greater possessions, the greater treasury, the greater stock of riding animals, the greater army, greater power, greater might: King Seniya Bimbisara of Magadha or King Pasenadi of Kosala?' This was the discussion that had come to no conclusion when the Blessed One arrived.

"It isn't right, monks, that sons of good families, on having gone forth out of faith from home to the homeless life, should talk on such a topic. When you have gathered you have two duties: either Dhamma-talk or noble silence."

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Any sensual bliss in the world,
    any heavenly bliss,
isn't worth one sixteenth-sixteenth
of the bliss of the ending of craving.

See also: AN X.69.


 


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